The Latest

wi-ch:

#tbt
…never showed this to anyone, then time flew by.
Oct 2, 2014 / 76 notes

wi-ch:

#tbt

…never showed this to anyone, then time flew by.

(via escapismtothemaximum)

blue-voids:

Carl Kleiner
Oct 2, 2014 / 250 notes
Oct 2, 2014 / 3,792 notes

tinycafe:

よわよわカメラ

(via minimarn)

davisanddarling:

Schiaparelli compact case.
Oct 2, 2014 / 1,988 notes

davisanddarling:

Schiaparelli compact case.

(via minimarn)

Oct 2, 2014 / 567 notes
justmakemexscream:

chubbyyprincess:

yasminabdulqadir:

how is Common so damn fine?

Daaaamn

bold guys are so fine
Oct 2, 2014 / 9,191 notes

justmakemexscream:

chubbyyprincess:

yasminabdulqadir:

how is Common so damn fine?

Daaaamn

bold guys are so fine

Oct 2, 2014 / 15,544 notes
justmakemexscream:

omg that’s me every winter :(
Oct 2, 2014 / 40,456 notes

justmakemexscream:

omg that’s me every winter :(

Oct 2, 2014 / 117 notes

(via minimarn)

Oct 2, 2014 / 5,711 notes

(via lifeftme)

aestheticgoddess:

Lesley Lawson aka Twiggy
Oct 1, 2014 / 288 notes

aestheticgoddess:

Lesley Lawson aka Twiggy

(via aestheticgoddess)

Oct 1, 2014 / 6,350 notes

(via 962404)

kemetic-dreams:

Kentake Page
Today we remember Mexico’s President of African descent, Vicente Guerrero officially abolishing the Maafa (slavery) in Mexico on September 16, 1829. The Maafa was banned soon after Mexico won its independence in 1821, but it was not officially abolished until 1829.

The existence of Afro-Mexicans was officially affirmed in the 1990s when the Mexican government acknowledged Africa as Mexico’s “third root”. But Mexico’s real history shows the African presence in the country going back thousands of years. 

Image: “Gathering of African Towns” by Mario Guzmán Oliveres (b. 1975), 2004. National Museum of Mexican Art Permanent Collection. 

Read more:http://newafricanmagazine.com/africas-lost-tribe-in-mexico/#sthash.peM9C9fh.dpuf
Oct 1, 2014 / 851 notes

kemetic-dreams:

Kentake Page
Today we remember Mexico’s President of African descent, Vicente Guerrero officially abolishing the Maafa (slavery) in Mexico on September 16, 1829. The Maafa was banned soon after Mexico won its independence in 1821, but it was not officially abolished until 1829.

The existence of Afro-Mexicans was officially affirmed in the 1990s when the Mexican government acknowledged Africa as Mexico’s “third root”. But Mexico’s real history shows the African presence in the country going back thousands of years.

Image: “Gathering of African Towns” by Mario Guzmán Oliveres (b. 1975), 2004. National Museum of Mexican Art Permanent Collection.

Read more:
http://newafricanmagazine.com/africas-lost-tribe-in-mexico/#sthash.peM9C9fh.dpuf

(via ourafrica)

Oct 1, 2014 / 108 notes

(via vintageii)

mpdrolet:

Wyne Veen
Oct 1, 2014 / 210 notes